Group Intervention Approaches

Children and young people with cognition and learning difficulties benefit from being taught in the classroom alongside good role models or in small groups for targeted work.
Group interventions designed to promote social interaction, waiting turns or being given time to think and plan within the group, would be considered appropriate. These are particularly useful for children and young people with difficulties around processing and knowledge retention.
It must be remembered that the focus of such group interventions is to enable progress. Such interventions are regarded as most effective when:-

  • They are guided by careful analysis of the group's needs

  • The interventions are adapted and combined to meet specific needs

  • Progress of the child/young person involved is carefully tracked

  • Staff involved have adequate training in the intervention

  • The intervention is planned and implemented in a timely fashion, given adequate time for impact to materialise

Different interventions have different timescales, depending on the way that they are expected to work. Some interventions might take longer and involve complex processes, which do not provide a quick fix. It is important to be clear about the aims and timeframe set so that the outcomes can be judged appropriately.


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