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Support for Adult Carers

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Do you help to look after someone else?  If so, support is available to you as well as the person you care for.  Please contact your local Adult Social Care office, or local carers organisation for further information.

Who is a carer?

Carers help look after other people.  Carers might be a relative, neighbour or friend of the person they help.  They are not paid for the care they provide, although carers may be eligible for certain state benefits.  Carers can be of any age, including older people, adults, children and young people.  Many carers do not consider themselves to be a carer and may not realise that there is support available to help them do their vital caring role.

Support for carers

Adult Social Care and local carers organisations work together to provide support to carers.  Carers can have an assessment of their own needs as a carer.  Often these assessments are carried out by carers organisations who can then arrange for a carers budget or for services to support the carer in their caring role. On occasion, services that support the cared for may also, with agreement, be employed to support the carer. 

Support for carers can include:

  • Information and advice
  • Breaks (sometimes called respite care)
  • Carers' emergency card
  • Emotional support
  • Support at home
  • Daily living equipment and adaptations to the home
  • Telecare alarms
  • Car badges for disabled drivers and passengers

Carers Support Cumbria is the consortia of local organisations who can provide this support, they can be contacted by phone on 0844 384 3230 or via email at adviceline@carlislecarers.co.uk.  The organisations which make up the consortia are:

Carers budgets 

Carers budgets are payments given to carers to buy goods or services for themselves (rather than the person they look after) to help them to continue to care.  These are identified in your carer's assessment.  It might include gym membership or other recreational activities, a short term break or practical equipment, such as a washing machine.

Breaks for carers

As a carer, you may need a break to give you some time away from your caring duties.  These breaks, sometimes called respite care, can be arranged: 

  • for just a few hours, as in the case of a sitting service or day care;
  • for longer periods of time, such as overnight stays or short breaks in a residential or nursing home; and
  • either as a one of or on a regular basis

To give you more control and choice, you may be able to arrange your own carer breaks through the use of direct payments.

Carers emergency card

The emergency card gives you, as a carer, peace of mind that should you have an accident or other emergency, a plan is in place to provide your caring role in the short term.